VIA| When a county police department in Tennessee made the delicious to include America’s national motto: “In God We Trust” on their patrol cars, a controversy on social media erupted.

While many police departments across the nation have been including the motto on their vehicles, the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Department has encountered undue flak from the liberal base in the state.

While most appreciate the sentiment, some people oppose including the word “God” on the police vehicles.

Allegedly, Sherriff Murray Blackwelder had wanted to put the stickers with the motto on the vehicles for months. But then a woman called the department and asked why the department wasn’t putting the national motto on the vehicles. When the call came in, the Sherriff knew he needed to put the words on his vehicles.

“For two months that bothered me, to be honest,” Blackwelder said.

“There’s not a good reason it wasn’t on there, when you get down to it. I did some research into it. It’s not illegal, and it’s the truth. We polled our deputies and they all agreed with it.”

When he finally decided to put the “In God We Trust” stickers on the Tennessee county police vehicles, some people pointed out that he wasn’t protecting the separation of church and state.

But the Sherriff said that even if he has a “Christian” message on his police cruisers, the department doesn’t discriminate who they help based on religion. In his words:

“We don’t ask you your religion when you call 911, we don’t ask you your religion when we pull you over, the law is the law and that’s what we’re here to enforce it.  We do have faith, we have faith that we’re going to be OK, that you’re going to be OK.”

But Chuck Miller of American Atheists says that the sticker “sends a particularly chilling message to those who are not Christians.”

Speaking up for non-Christians, Miller said the following:

“Two wolves can decide to have a sheep for dinner, and that’s exactly what happens to people in the minority when you let the majority rule,” he said.

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