Legalized theft: Italian high court rules it is not against the law to steal food

Laws are put in place in a society to both lay down legal and moral boundaries, and to ensure that a citizenry does not fall into anarchy when they find it easier to commit a crime than to work honestly towards a solution.  And perhaps no greater example in recent days could be with the establishment of transgender bathroom rights, which just days after their legalization had both stalkers and sexual predators abusing this politically correct edict.

A Seattle man, citing transgender bathrooms laws, was able to gain access to a women’s locker-room at a public recreational center while little girls were changing for swim practice.

In February, The Daily Wire reported that a Seattle man who walked into the women’s locker-room—on two occasionsand began undressing, cited the “new state rule that allows people to choose a bathroom based on gender identity.” You know, those laws the ingenious left has been pushing because of “inclusiveness.”

“It was a busy time at Evans Pool around 5:30 p.m. Monday February 8,” reports KING5 News. “The pool was open for lap swim. According to Seattle Parks and Recreation, a man wearing board shorts entered the women’s locker room and took off his shirt. Women alerted staff, who told the man to leave, but he said ‘the law has changed and I have a right to be here.’”

Subsequent to this new rule, no one called the police on this man who reportedly came back a second time when young girls were changing into their swimsuits for swim practice. – Daily Wire

And now in Italy, a new ruling by their high court has made it no longer a crime to steal food from any and all retailers if the individual claims only that they were hungry.

Stealing small amounts of food to stave off hunger is not a crime, Italy’s highest court of appeal has ruled.

Judges overturned a theft conviction against Roman Ostriakov after he stole cheese and sausages worth €4.07 (£3; $4.50) from a supermarket.

Mr Ostriakov, a homeless man of Ukrainian background, had taken the food “in the face of the immediate and essential need for nourishment”, the court of cassation decided.

Therefore it was not a crime, it said.

A fellow customer informed the store’s security in 2011, when Mr Ostriakov attempted to leave a Genoa supermarket with two pieces of cheese and a packet of sausages in his pocket but paid only for breadsticks. – BBC

In both U.S. and European societies, trillions are spent each year to subsidize the poor, the hungry, and those unable to earn a living, but that has not stopped people from both bending the laws in regards to welfare, nor using the programs to engage in further crimes (such as using welfare to purchase drugs).

Without a rule of law, portions of society would naturally revert to the law of the jungle, where might makes right, and the strongest seek to dominate the weakest.  This has long been documented in instances in both Europe (during the Dark Ages), and in the U.S. during the Wild West days when law enforcement was limited in these territories.

no arrest required

Italy’s new ruling will open Pandora’s Box for legalized theft, where the perpetrator can simply use the argument that they were hungry to justify their actions.  And as we have now seen with sexual predators bending the spirit of the transgender bathroom laws, so too will many bend the spirit of this ruling even though avenues exist for them to seem accommodation for their hunger by any myriad of safety nets.

Kenneth Schortgen Jr is a writer for,, and To the Death Media, and hosts the popular web blog, The Daily Economist. Ken can also be heard Wednesday afternoons giving an weekly economic report on the Angel Clark radio show.