Public can now search offshore companies involved in Panama Papers data hack

Many times when whistleblower organizations release information from hacked or third party provided sources, the data is dumped in a non-linear method which makes it harder for the common person to sift through the meta-data to find important points which can be of some use.  However, after weeks of criticism by the likes of Wikileaks and other alternative outlets which pointed out that the ICIJ ‘cherry picked’ corporations released in their first announcement of those who offshored money and assets, the independent media organization has now opened up the entire hacked database to the public and has even created a search engine for easier access.

The enormous bundle of 11.5 million documents exposing hundreds of thousands of companies and individuals is online as a searchable database with interactive visualization depicting links between persons, companies and countries.

According to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), an organization which, until today, had sole access to the documents, the database reveals the names of the real owners of many shell companies.

The website opens with a disclaimer, noting that there not all people and organizations on the list use tax havens illegally. The statement also mentions that many people have similar names, and recommends diligent ID validation. – Sputnik News



The law firm of Mossack Fonseca that was the source of the Panama Papers is not the only Panamanian entity involved in securing hidden and secretive protections for companies and individuals to offshore their assets.  In fact, one of the more well known figures involved in Panama is former presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who’s Bain Capital not only started its company by accumulating investors who hid their assets on the Isthmus, but they themselves also function in Panama by keeping monies and business dealings in firms located on the island nation.

The right to offshore one’s wealth is not only legal, but it is also most often used by the very politicians and elite who are now hypocritically speaking out on others who do or want to potentially move their wealth outside their respective countries.  And in the end, the Panama Papers scandal is little more than a political agenda underwritten by the elite to keep a division going between the haves and have nots, and to attempt to scare others from getting their assets out of the United States before the government has a chance to steal them during some future financial crisis.

Kenneth Schortgen Jr is a writer for,, and To the Death Media, and hosts the popular web blog, The Daily Economist. Ken can also be heard Wednesday afternoons giving an weekly economic report on the Angel Clark radio show.